Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Installing Raspbian on the Raspberry Pi 3 using raspbian-ua-netinst

I really like using the Raspbian unattended netinstaller (raspbian-ua-netinst) for doing headless installs of Raspbian to Raspberry Pi devices. You pretty much write the installer image to SD, create a configuration file, then insert the SD into the Pi and let it do the rest.

I wasn't able to install Raspbian to my Raspberry Pi 3 using the current latest build (1.0.9) of raspbian-ua-netinst as it still lacks support for this newer hardware.

Below is a quick guide on what I did to get it up and running successfully. I ran this from a Raspberry Pi but you could just as easily use any Linux machine:

Pull down the v1.1.x branch from GitHub:
$ git clone -b v1.1.x https://github.com/debian-pi/raspbian-ua-netinst.git

Download and build:
$ cd raspbian-ua-netinst
$ ./build.sh

Create the images you can then write to SD, this requires root for the loopback setup:
$ sudo ./buildroot.sh

If using a Raspberry Pi with limited swap like myself, you may get an error when creating the xz archive due to it being unable to allocate sufficient memory to xz. It's no problem as you can use the uncompressed or bz2 image.

As an example you could run bzcat raspbian-ua-netinst-20170426-gited24416.img.bz2 redirected to the destination SD card (the card itself, not a partition device).

Hopefully this post will be redundant soon when a newer raspbian-ua-netinst is released with Raspberry Pi 3 support, but until then I hope this is useful to someone!

Monday, 19 December 2016

Issue where KVM guest freezes just before installation of CentOS 7

I've been playing around with KVM on CentOS 7 in preparation for the RHCE exam. I was experiencing an issue where the guest virtual machine would freeze just before attempting an install (again, CentOS 7 as the guest).

The testing machine is quite old (has an Intel Core 2 6400 CPU) but it hasn't shown any other symptoms of hardware issues.

The logs didn't appear to show anything of interest other than some debugging information which is apparently normal:
[20389.379023] kvm [19537]: vcpu0 unhandled rdmsr: 0x60d
[20389.379034] kvm [19537]: vcpu0 unhandled rdmsr: 0x3f8
[20389.379039] kvm [19537]: vcpu0 unhandled rdmsr: 0x3f9
[20389.379043] kvm [19537]: vcpu0 unhandled rdmsr: 0x3fa
[20389.379048] kvm [19537]: vcpu0 unhandled rdmsr: 0x630
[20389.379053] kvm [19537]: vcpu0 unhandled rdmsr: 0x631
[20389.379057] kvm [19537]: vcpu0 unhandled rdmsr: 0x632

Anyway, I was able to work around the issue by feeding the "--cpu host" option to virt-install, or by ticking "Copy host CPU configuration" under the CPUs tab of the VM configuration.

Hope this helps save someone else some time!

Monday, 10 October 2016

Installing Debian on the APU2

This is a short post detailing the install of Debian on the PC Engines APU2 using PXE.

First of all you'll need to ensure you are running version 160311 or newer BIOS. You can find the BIOS update details here. If the PXE options are missing then there's a good chance you aren't running a new enough BIOS!

Connect to the system's console via the serial port using a baud rate of 115,200. I typically use screen on Linux/macOS or PuTTY on Windows.

Start the APU2 and press Ctrl+B when prompted to enter iPXE, or choose iPXE from the boot selection menu (F10).

Attept boot from PXE using DHCP:
iPXE> autoboot

If all is well you will get to the "Debian GNU/Linux installer boot menu" heading, press TAB to edit the Install menu entry.

This should bring up something along the lines of:
> debian-installer/amd64/linux vga=788 initrd=debian-installer/amd64/initrd.gz --- quiet

You'll want to define the serial console by adding the console parameter to the end (and preseed parameter if used):
> debian-installer/amd64/linux vga=788 initrd=debian-installer/amd64/initrd.gz --- quiet console=ttyS0,115200

Press enter and you should be on your way!

PXE boot Debian using RouterOS as PXE server

I would typically use a Linux server for the purposes of PXE booting, but this is so straightforward it's a very attractive option. I'm using a MikroTik RB2011 (RouterOS v6.34.6) successfully.

This example assumes your router's LAN IP is 172.16.8.1 and the local subnet is 172.16.8.0/24.

First of all, download the netboot archive to a Linux machine (I'm using a Raspberry Pi here):
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ wget http://ftp.au.debian.org/debian/dists/jessie/main/installer-amd64/current/images/netboot/netboot.tar.gz
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ wget http://ftp.au.debian.org/debian/dists/jessie/main/installer-amd64/current/images/SHA256SUMS

Check that your archive matches the checksum file:
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ grep `sha256sum netboot.tar.gz` SHA256SUMS
SHA256SUMS:460e2ed7db2d98edb09e5413ad72b71e3132a9628af01d793aaca90e7b317d46  ./netboot/netboot.tar.gz

Extract the archive to a tftp directory:
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ mkdir tftp && tar xf netboot.tar.gz -C tftp

Copy tftp folder to the MikroTik:
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ scp -r tftp admin-tim@172.16.8.1:

On the MikroTik, configure TFTP on MikroTik with a base directory of /tftp (omitting req-filename matches all):
[admin-tim@MikroTik] /ip tftp add ip-address=172.16.8.0/24 real-filename=tftp

Configure DHCP for PXE booting:
[admin-tim@MikroTik] /ip dhcp-server network set [ find address=172.16.8.0/24 ] boot-file-name=pxelinux.0 next-server=172.16.8.1

Thursday, 4 August 2016

Electric bike build part 5

Continued from Electric bike build part 4.

After about 6 revisions I finally had a workable design for mounting my accessories. I decided to design a mount in two parts that when brought together form a ring around the stem to allow a second "row" of stuff to be mounted.

Here's the final design:


It is all held together only by the accessories mounted to it, but it seems quite solid. Originally the top and bottom parts were identical, but I had to change to an offset design to mount the light higher. The larger lobe is to accomodate the headlight's mount which is designed for an oversized bar.

Here's everything bolted up and in place, I'm very happy with the result:


The throttle is easily within reach of my left thumb when not in the drops, and I can safely keep my right hand near the front brake at the same time. I also really like having the Bafang display quite far forward as it makes it always easy to see. The IPS display looks amazing even in direct sunlight:


I took the bike for a test ride and wasn't able to wipe the grin from my face! Talk about making cycling effortless!

Here's the bike fully completed, although disregard the low seat hight:


The 42/11-30 gearing seems to work quite well for my intended purpose of using this bike as a commuter.

I have a warning though; I have used the bike four times now and have done about 90km. In the last 10km I noticed a bit of a clicking noise when pedalling, it turns out the lock ring had become slightly lose. This surprised me as I used thread locker and applied the correct amount of torque to the lock ring, I assumed the ones having trouble weren't doing the install correctly. Today I re-tightened the lock ring to "epic tight" and will monitor it.

Electric bike build part 4

Continued from Electric bike build part 3.

The next stage of the build was fitting the additional sensors. The kit came with a wheel speed sensor, and as my bike has drop bars I optioned two HWBS (Hidden Wire Brake Sensor) devices.

Here's the wheel speed sensor and magnet fitted, talk about a monster magnet:


I decided to fit the brake sensors along the bars themselves by peeling back the bar tape a bit:


No where to be seen, and as an added bonus gives the bars quite an ergo feel:


I now had to plan where to mount the screen, throttle and controls. I also had to keep room for a headlight and Garmin bike computer. The biggest problem (which I had known all along) was the internal diameter of the throttle and controls (22.2mm) being too small for my drop bars.

Having access to a 3D printer, I designed some parts to mount these accessories.

The first part I designed was a spacer for the DPC-14 display so I could orient the screen on the bracket by 180 degrees. Some Bafang documentation suggests this is possible but on my screen with a charge port, the charge port wires get in the way.

Here are some pics of the screen with the spacer fitted, and with the fasteners replaced with longer ones to retain the same thread engagement:




You can download the model file from Thingiverse.

Continued at Electric bike build part 5.

Saturday, 23 July 2016

Electric bike build part 3

Continued from Electric bike build part 2.

I now had all the parts and tools available to fit the motor to the BB shell. I had read that the high torque from the motor could dent alloy frames so I picked up some Neoprene rubber to try and reduce the chance of this happening:


Rubber applied:


Test fit, the final fit will have the rubber fully compressed between the motor and frame:


Looks good!

One slight issue I had was the hole on this steel bracket being drilled slightly offset, meaning the fastener wasn't able to be fitted without binding. I drilled the hole 0.5mm larger then nail polished the exposed metal:


Thanks yet again to my Aldi bike toolkit I had the right tool on hand. I was able to (blue) Loctite then tighten at the same time as holding the motor against the frame fully compressing the rubber:


All done:


I then applied Loctite to the two additional bolts and the extra lockring (you can use a standard Shimano Hollowtech II tool) then fitted:


Here's a pic after I fitted both crankarms and chain:


It's starting to come together!


Continued at Electric bike build part 4.