Monday, 10 October 2016

PXE boot Debian using RouterOS as PXE server

I would typically use a Linux server for the purposes of PXE booting, but this is so straightforward it's a very attractive option. I'm using a MikroTik RB2011 (RouterOS v6.34.6) successfully.

This example assumes your router's LAN IP is 172.16.8.1 and the local subnet is 172.16.8.0/24.

First of all, download the netboot archive to a Linux machine (I'm using a Raspberry Pi here):
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ wget http://ftp.au.debian.org/debian/dists/jessie/main/installer-amd64/current/images/netboot/netboot.tar.gz
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ wget http://ftp.au.debian.org/debian/dists/jessie/main/installer-amd64/current/images/SHA256SUMS

Check that your archive matches the checksum file:
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ grep `sha256sum netboot.tar.gz` SHA256SUMS
SHA256SUMS:460e2ed7db2d98edb09e5413ad72b71e3132a9628af01d793aaca90e7b317d46  ./netboot/netboot.tar.gz

Extract the archive to a tftp directory:
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ mkdir tftp && tar xf netboot.tar.gz -C tftp

Copy tftp folder to the MikroTik:
tim@raspberrypi /tmp $ scp -r tftp admin-tim@172.16.8.1:

On the MikroTik, configure TFTP on MikroTik with a base directory of /tftp (omitting req-filename matches all):
[admin-tim@MikroTik] /ip tftp add ip-address=172.16.8.0/24 real-filename=tftp

Configure DHCP for PXE booting:
[admin-tim@MikroTik] /ip dhcp-server network set [ find address=172.16.8.0/24 ] boot-file-name=pxelinux.0 next-server=172.16.8.1

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